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What is Contingent Liabilities?

Avatar 37a3bd7bc7328f0ead2c0f6f635dddf60615e676e6b4ddf964144012e529de45 preetham asked over 2 years ago

Hi I am Preetham. I am preparing for CA exam. May I know, What is Contingent Liabilities?

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9 Answers
Avatar 37a3bd7bc7328f0ead2c0f6f635dddf60615e676e6b4ddf964144012e529de45 acharya answered over 2 years ago

--A contingent liability is a potential liability...it depends on a future event occurring or not occurring. For example, if a parent guarantees a daughter's first car loan, the parent has a contingent liability. If the daughter makes her car payments and pays off the loan, the parent will have no liability. If the daughter fails to make the payments, the parent will have a liability. --If a company is sued by a former employee for $500,000 for age discrimination, the company has a contingent liability. If the company is found guilty, it will have a liability. However, if the company is not found guilty, the company will not have an actual liability.

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Avatar 37a3bd7bc7328f0ead2c0f6f635dddf60615e676e6b4ddf964144012e529de45 Anil Dhawan answered over 2 years ago

Definition: A contingent liability is either a possible obligation arising from past events and depending on future events not under an entity's control, or a present obligation not recognized because either the entity cannot measure the obligation or settlement is not probable. You do not recognize a contingent liability. Instead, only disclose the existence of the contingent liability, unless the possibility of payment is remote. There are three possible scenarios for contingent liabilities, all of which involve different accounting transactions. They are: Recordation. Record a contingent liability when it is probable that a loss will occur, and you can reasonably estimate the amount of the loss. If you can only estimate a range of possible amounts, then record that amount in the range that appears to be a better estimate than any other amount; if no amount is better, then record the lowest amount in the range. “Probable” means that the future event is likely to occur. You should also describe the liability in the footnotes that accompany the financial statements. Disclosure. Disclose the existence of a contingent liability in the notes accompanying the financial statements if the liability is reasonably possible but not probable, or if the liability is probable, but you cannot estimate the amount. “Reasonably possible” means that the chance of the event occurring is more than remote but less than likely. No treatment. Do not record or disclose a contingent liability if the probability of its occurrence is remote. Examples of contingent liabilities are: 1.The outcome of a lawsuit 2.A government investigation 3.The threat of expropriation.

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Avatar 37a3bd7bc7328f0ead2c0f6f635dddf60615e676e6b4ddf964144012e529de45 veeru answered over 2 years ago

--A contingent liability is a potential liability...it depends on a future event occurring or not occurring. For example, if a parent guarantees a daughter's first car loan, the parent has a contingent liability. If the daughter makes her car payments and pays off the loan, the parent will have no liability. If the daughter fails to make the payments, the parent will have a liability. --If a company is sued by a former employee for $500,000 for age discrimination, the company has a contingent liability. If the company is found guilty, it will have a liability. However, if the company is not found guilty, the company will not have an actual liability. --In accounting, a contingent liability and the related contingent loss are recorded with a journal entry only if the contingency is both probable and the amount can be estimated.

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Avatar 37a3bd7bc7328f0ead2c0f6f635dddf60615e676e6b4ddf964144012e529de45 CA Sandeep Bohra answered over 2 years ago

> What is Contingent Liabilities? --Hypothetical liability which depends on a possible (but hardly likely) event or situation to occur before becoming an actual liability. Contingent liabilities are different for every type of business and profession, and management makes provision for them by setting aside appropriate funds as reserves. Examples include acts of employees, credit guaranties, incomplete contracts, pending court cases, third party indemnities, unfilled purchase orders, unsettled disputes, etc. Under corporate-legislation, contingent liabilities must be disclosed in a balance sheet via an explanatory note (footnote). Contingent Liability A liability that a company may have to pay, but only if a certain future event occurs. Usually, a contingent liability refers to the outcome of a lawsuit: that is, the company may have to pay a significant amount of money if it loses the lawsuit. Contingent liabilities are recorded under accounts payable; their existence may also affect the share price. **--Contingent Liability** --A contingent liability is a potential liability...it depends on a future event occurring or not occurring. For example, if a parent guarantees a daughter's first car loan, the parent has a contingent liability. If the daughter makes her car payments and pays off the loan, the parent will have no liability. If the daughter fails to make the payments, the parent will have a liability. --If a company is sued by a former employee for $500,000 for age discrimination, the company has a contingent liability. If the company is found guilty, it will have a liability. However, if the company is not found guilty, the company will not have an actual liability. --In accounting, a contingent liability and the related contingent loss are recorded with a journal entry only if the contingency is both probable and the amount can be estimated. --If a contingent liability is only possible (not probable), or if the amount cannot be estimated, a journal entry is not required. However, a disclosure is required. --When a contingent liability is remote (such as a nuisance suit), then neither a journal nor a disclosure is required.

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Open uri20170510 32134 1c996lj?1494421732 Anil answered over 2 years ago

Hypothetical liability which depends on a possible (but hardly likely) event or situation to occur before becoming an actual liability. Contingent liabilities are different for every type of business and profession, and management makes provision for them by setting aside appropriate funds as reserves. Examples include acts of employees, credit guaranties, incomplete contracts, pending court cases, third party indemnities, unfilled purchase orders, unsettled disputes, etc. Under corporate-legislation, contingent liabilities must be disclosed in a balance sheet via an explanatory note (footnote). Contingent Liability A liability that a company may have to pay, but only if a certain future event occurs. Usually, a contingent liability refers to the outcome of a lawsuit: that is, the company may have to pay a significant amount of money if it loses the lawsuit. Contingent liabilities are recorded under accounts payable; their existence may also affect the share price.

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Avatar 37a3bd7bc7328f0ead2c0f6f635dddf60615e676e6b4ddf964144012e529de45 veeru answered over 2 years ago

Definition: A contingent liability is either a possible obligation arising from past events and depending on future events not under an entity's control, or a present obligation not recognized because either the entity cannot measure the obligation or settlement is not probable. You do not recognize a contingent liability. Instead, only disclose the existence of the contingent liability, unless the possibility of payment is remote. There are three possible scenarios for contingent liabilities, all of which involve different accounting transactions. They are: Recordation. Record a contingent liability when it is probable that a loss will occur, and you can reasonably estimate the amount of the loss. If you can only estimate a range of possible amounts, then record that amount in the range that appears to be a better estimate than any other amount; if no amount is better, then record the lowest amount in the range. “Probable” means that the future event is likely to occur. You should also describe the liability in the footnotes that accompany the financial statements.

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Picsjoin 2017224123730582 Archana answered over 2 years ago

Hie Preetham, **Contingent Liability** - A contingent liability is a potential liability...it depends on a future event occurring or not occurring. For example, if a parent guarantees a daughter's first car loan, the parent has a contingent liability. If the daughter makes her car payments and pays off the loan, the parent will have no liability. If the daughter fails to make the payments, the parent will have a liability. - If a company is sued by a former employee for $500,000 for age discrimination, the company has a contingent liability. If the company is found guilty, it will have a liability. However, if the company is not found guilty, the company will not have an actual liability. - In accounting, a contingent liability and the related contingent loss are recorded with a journal entry only if the contingency is both probable and the amount can be estimated. - If a contingent liability is only possible (not probable), or if the amount cannot be estimated, a journal entry is not required. However, a disclosure is required. - When a contingent liability is remote (such as a nuisance suit), then neither a journal nor a disclosure is required.

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Avatar 37a3bd7bc7328f0ead2c0f6f635dddf60615e676e6b4ddf964144012e529de45 B.Shyam answered over 2 years ago

Contingent is the liability which arises due to known situations but the out off such situation is unpredictable for example : if there is a case pending the court against the company and the company has a chance either to win the case or lose the case in if the company has chance to win then such issue to be treated as contingent asset and if the company has a chance to lose the case then it should be treated as the contingent liability from the above it can be said that a liability which can arise due to the present situation

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Avatar 37a3bd7bc7328f0ead2c0f6f635dddf60615e676e6b4ddf964144012e529de45 jitendra etikala answered over 2 years ago

> Contingent Liability Definition: A contingent liability is either a possible obligation arising from past events and depending on future events not under an entity's control, or a present obligation not recognized because either the entity cannot measure the obligation or settlement is not probable. You do not recognize a contingent liability. Instead, only disclose the existence of the contingent liability, unless the possibility of payment is remote. There are three possible scenarios for contingent liabilities, all of which involve different accounting transactions. They are: Recordation. Record a contingent liability when it is probable that a loss will occur, and you can reasonably estimate the amount of the loss. If you can only estimate a range of possible amounts, then record that amount in the range that appears to be a better estimate than any other amount; if no amount is better, then record the lowest amount in the range. “Probable” means that the future event is likely to occur. You should also describe the liability in the footnotes that accompany the financial statements. Disclosure. Disclose the existence of a contingent liability in the notes accompanying the financial statements if the liability is reasonably possible but not probable, or if the liability is probable, but you cannot estimate the amount. “Reasonably possible” means that the chance of the event occurring is more than remote but less than likely. No treatment. Do not record or disclose a contingent liability if the probability of its occurrence is remote. **Examples of contingent liabilities are:** 1.The outcome of a lawsuit 2.A government investigation 3.The threat of expropriation. A warranty can also be considered a contingent liability.

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