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Have you ever been involved in an invoice dispute? How did you manage the problem?

Avatar 37a3bd7bc7328f0ead2c0f6f635dddf60615e676e6b4ddf964144012e529de45 kruthika asked over 2 years ago

Hi I am Kruthika. I am preparing for CA exam. May I know, Have you ever been involved in an invoice dispute? How did you manage the problem?

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3 Answers
Avatar 37a3bd7bc7328f0ead2c0f6f635dddf60615e676e6b4ddf964144012e529de45 acharya answered about 2 years ago

Invoicing and collecting payments is one of the most troublesome parts of being an accountant. No one wants to be the bill collector, but sometimes we can’t help it – it’s part of the job. You get anxious and prepare yourself for a battle over a bill; you also get frustrated because the client simply doesn’t understand that this is business, not personal. Most invoice disputes can be handled through conversation, and misunderstandings are unavoidable and can escalate quickly, particularly when a large amount of money is involved. Thus, when you’re applying for an accounting position (where invoice disputes are always encountered), the hiring manager will be interested in how you handle these issues. He or she wants to hear how you deal with clients and customers; the interviewer wants to assess the depth of your patience, and wants to see if you’ve been involved in an invoice dispute and you resolved it.

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Avatar 37a3bd7bc7328f0ead2c0f6f635dddf60615e676e6b4ddf964144012e529de45 CA Sandeep Bohra answered over 2 years ago

Dear Friend, **Have you ever been involved in an invoice dispute? How did you manage the problem?** Working with a client can go extremely well... until they get the invoice. There will always be times when clients don’t agree with the price or claim that they didn’t get the proper service. Invoicing and collecting payments is one of the most troublesome parts of being an accountant. No one wants to be the bill collector, but sometimes we can’t help it – it’s part of the job. You get anxious and prepare yourself for a battle over a bill; you also get frustrated because the client simply doesn’t understand that this is business, not personal. Most invoice disputes can be handled through conversation, and misunderstandings are unavoidable and can escalate quickly, particularly when a large amount of money is involved. Thus, when you’re applying for an accounting position (where invoice disputes are always encountered), the hiring manager will be interested in how you handle these issues. He or she wants to hear how you deal with clients and customers; the interviewer wants to assess the depth of your patience, and wants to see if you’ve been involved in an invoice dispute and you resolved it. How do you answer his or her question? How do you convince the interviewer that handling invoice disputes is a manageable task for you? There are a number of ways to do that, and here are five of them: Prepare yourself beforehand by listing all of the qualities that an accountant should have when dealing with invoice disputes. Come up with a simple and professional yet impressive answer. Moreover, include these things on your list: •Make all of your facts available. It’s easier to handle disputes when you have your facts and evidence at hand. Chances are, you and your client will come up with an agreement in little to no time. •Be objective and firm. Understand the client’s situation, yet don’t forget to be rational. Calmly address the issue, and offer a solution if needed. •Be organized and prepared. Prepare a contract, and never begin work without it. Before you work with the client, you should have already prepared for it so that if things don’t come easily, you’ll have the contract as a proof of your agreement.

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Avatar 37a3bd7bc7328f0ead2c0f6f635dddf60615e676e6b4ddf964144012e529de45 DISHANT answered over 2 years ago

Working with a client can go extremely well... until they get the invoice. There will always be times when clients don’t agree with the price or claim that they didn’t get the proper service. Invoicing and collecting payments is one of the most troublesome parts of being an accountant. No one wants to be the bill collector, but sometimes we can’t help it – it’s part of the job. You get anxious and prepare yourself for a battle over a bill; you also get frustrated because the client simply doesn’t understand that this is business, not personal. Most invoice disputes can be handled through conversation, and misunderstandings are unavoidable and can escalate quickly, particularly when a large amount of money is involved. Thus, when you’re applying for an accounting position (where invoice disputes are always encountered), the hiring manager will be interested in how you handle these issues. He or she wants to hear how you deal with clients and customers; the interviewer wants to assess the depth of your patience, and wants to see if you’ve been involved in an invoice dispute and you resolved it. How do you answer his or her question? How do you convince the interviewer that handling invoice disputes is a manageable task for you? There are a number of ways to do that, and here are five of them: 1. Prepare yourself beforehand by listing all of the qualities that an accountant should have when dealing with invoice disputes. Come up with a simple and professional yet impressive answer. Moreover, include these things on your list: •Make all of your facts available. It’s easier to handle disputes when you have your facts and evidence at hand. Chances are, you and your client will come up with an agreement in little to no time. •Be objective and firm. Understand the client’s situation, yet don’t forget to be rational. Calmly address the issue, and offer a solution if needed. •Be organized and prepared. Prepare a contract, and never begin work without it. Before you work with the client, you should have already prepared for it so that if things don’t come easily, you’ll have the contract as a proof of your agreement.

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