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Detailed IFRS Structure of the IFRS and IASB

IFRS Structure of the IFRS and IASB

IFRS Structure of the IFRS and IASB: The International Financial Reporting Standards Foundation, or IFRS Foundation, is a nonprofit accounting organization. Its main objectives include the development and promotion of the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs) through the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), which it oversees.

The foundation was formerly named the International Accounting Standards Committee (IASC) Foundation until a renaming on 1 July 2010, and as of 2012 is governed by a board of 22 trustees.

The International Financial Reporting Standards, usually called the IFRS Standards,are standards issued by the IFRS Foundation and the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) to provide a common global language for business affairs so that company accounts are understandable and comparable across international boundaries. They are a consequence of growing international shareholding and trade and are particularly important for companies that have dealings in several countries. They are progressively replacing the many different national accounting standards. They are the rules to be followed by accountants to maintain books of accounts which are comparable, understandable, reliable and relevant as per the users internal or external. IFRS, with the exception of IAS 29 Financial Reporting in Hyperinflationary Economies and IFRIC 7 Applying the Restatement Approach under IAS 29, are authorized in terms of the historical cost paradigm. IAS 29 and IFRIC 7 are authorized in terms of the units of constant purchasing power paradigm.

IFRS began as an attempt to harmonize accounting across the European Union but the value of harmonization quickly made the concept attractive around the world. However, it has been debated whether or not de facto harmonization has occurred. Standards that were issued by IASC (the predecessor of IASB) are still within use today and go by the name International Accounting Standards (IAS), while standards issued by IASB are called IFRS. IAS were issued between 1973 and 2001 by the Board of the International Accounting Standards Committee (IASC). On 1 April 2001, the new International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) took over from the IASC the responsibility for setting International Accounting Standards. During its first meeting the new Board adopted existing IAS and Standing Interpretations Committee standards (SICs). The IASB has continued to develop standards calling the new standards “International Financial Reporting Standards”.

In the absence of a Standard or an Interpretation that specifically applies to a transaction, management must use its judgement in developing and applying an accounting policy that results in information that is relevant and reliable. In making that judgement, IAS 8.11 requires management to consider the definitions, recognition criteria, and measurement concepts for assets, liabilities, income, and expenses in the Framework.

Criticisms of IFRS are (1) that they are not being adopted in the US (see GAAP), (2) a number of criticisms from France and (3) that IAS 29 Financial Reporting in Hyperinflation Economies had no positive effect at all during 6 years in Zimbabwe’s hyperinflationary economy. The IASB offered responses to the first two criticisms, but has offered no response to the last criticism while IAS 29 was as of March 2014 being implemented in its original ineffective form in Venezuela and Belarus.

IFRS Structure of the IFRS and IASB

The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) is the independent, accounting standard-setting body of the IFRS Foundation.

The IASB was founded on April 1, 2001, as the successor to the International Accounting Standards Committee (IASC). It is responsible for developing International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), previously known as International Accounting Standards (IAS) and promoting the use and application of these standards

IFRS Structure of the IFRS and IASB: Foundation

On December 31, 2001, The International Accounting Standards Foundation (IASF) was incorporated as a tax-exempt organization in the U.S. state of Delaware.On February 6, 2001, the International Financial Reporting Standards Foundation was also incorporated as a tax-exempt organization in Delaware. The IFRS Foundation is an independent, not-for-profit organisation. Its primary mission is to develop, in the public interest, a single set of high-quality, understandable, enforceable and globally accepted International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) based upon clearly articulated principles.

IFRS are developed by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), the independent standard-setting body of the IFRS Foundation.The IASB assumed accounting standard-setting responsibilities from its predecessor body, the International Accounting Standards Committee (IASC), on March 1, 2001. This was the culmination of a restructuring based on the recommendations of the report Recommendations on Shaping IASC for the Future.

The IASB forms part the three-tier structure employed by the IFRS Foundation and is responsible for setting the IFRS and related technical activities. The IASB is overseen by the Trustees of the IFRS Foundation, responsible for the organisation’s governance, the appointment of IASB members and funding. The IFRS Foundation is publicly accountable to a Monitoring Board of capital market authorities.

IFRS Structure of the IFRS and IASB: Members

The IASB originally had 13 full-time Board members, each with one vote. They are selected as a group of experts with a mix of experience of standard-setting, preparing and using accounts, and academic work.At their January 2009 meeting the Trustees of the Foundation concluded the first part of the second Constitution Review, announcing the creation of a Monitoring Board and the expansion of the IASB to 16 members and giving more consideration to the geographical composition of the IASB.

The IFRS Interpretations Committee has 14 members. Its brief is to provide timely guidance on issues that arise in practice.

A unanimous vote is not necessary in order for the publication of a Standard, exposure draft, or final “IFRIC” Interpretation. The Board’s 2008 Due Process manual stated that approval by nine of the members is required.

IFRS Structure of the IFRS and IASB

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