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CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development – These notes are for various topics which are useful in CBSE class 11th Economics Part B Indian Economic Development . These notes are available in pdf/ppt format and can be downloaded and used freely.

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development syllabus and marks weightage

Part BPart B: Indian Economic Development
4.Development Experience (1947-90) and13
Economic Reforms since 199112
5.Current Challenges facing Indian Economy15
6.Development Experience of India – A Comparison with Neighbours (OTBA)10
Part CProject Work10

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development contains following Units and chapters details.

Part B: Indian Economic Development

Unit 4: Development Experience (1947-90) and Economic Reforms since 1991

A brief introduction of the state of Indian economy on the eve of independence. Common goals of Five Year Plans.

Main features, problems and policies of agriculture (institutional aspects and new agricultural strategy, etc.), industry (industrial licensing, etc.) and foreign trade.

Economic Reforms since 1991:

Need and main features – liberalisation, globalisation and privatisation; An appraisal of LPG policies

Unit 5: Current challenges facing Indian Economy

Poverty – absolute and relative; Main programmes for poverty alleviation: A critical assessment;

Rural development: Key issues – credit and marketing – role of cooperatives; agricultural diversification; alternative farming – organic farming

Human Capital Formation: How people become resource; Role of human capital in economic development; Growth of Education Sector in India

Employment: Formal and informal, growth and other issues: Problems and policies.

Inflation: Problems and Policies

Infrastructure: Meaning and Types: Case Studies: Energy and Health: Problems and Policies- A critical assessment;

Sustainable Economic Development: Meaning, Effects of Economic Development on Resources and Environment, including global warming.

Unit 6: Development Experience of India

A comparison with neighbours

India and Pakistan

India and China

Issues: growth, population, sectoral development and other developmental indicators.

India’s Economic Development: Role of States

India is world’s 12th largest economy and also the 4th largest in terms of purchasing power parity adjusted exchange rates (PPP). It is the 128th largest in the world on per capita basis and 118th by PPP. However, states have a major role to play in the economic development of India. There are few states which have higher annualized 1999-2008 growth rates comparing to others. The growth rates for the states like Gujarat (8.8%), Haryana (8.7%) and Delhi (7.4%) are considerably higher than other states like Bihar (5.1%), Uttar Pradesh (4.4%) and Madhya Pradesh (3.5%).

Indian Economy on the Eve of Independence

INTRODUCTION
The primary objective of this book, Indian Economic Development, is to familiarise you with the basic features of the
Indian economy, and its development, as it is today, in the aftermath of Independence. However, it is equally important
to know something about the country’s economic past even as you learn about its present state and future prospects.
So, let us first look at the state of India’s economy prior to the country’s independence and form an idea of the various
considerations that shaped India’s post-independence development strategy.
The structure of India’s presentday economy is not just of current making; it has its roots steeped in history, particularly
in the period when India was under British rule which lasted for almost two centuries before India finally won its
independence on 15 August 1947. The sole purpose of the British colonial rule in India was to reduce the country to
being a feeder economy for Great Britain’s own rapidly expanding modern industrial base. An understanding of the
exploitative nature of this relationship is essential for any assessment of the kind and level of development which the
Indian economy has been able to attain over the last six decades.

LOW LEVEL OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT UNDER THE COLONIAL RULE

India had an independent economy before the advent of the British rule. Though agriculture was the main source of livelihood for most people, yet, the country’s economy was characterised by various kinds of manufacturing activities.
India was particularly well known for its handicraft industries in the fields of cotton and silk textiles, metal and precious
stone works etc. These products enjoyed a worldwide market based on the reputation of the fine quality of material used
and the high standards of craftsmanship seen in all imports from India.
The economic policies pursued by the colonial government in India were concerned more with the protection and
promotion of the economic interests of their home country than with the development of the Indian economy. Such
policies brought about a fundamental change in the structure of the Indian economy — transforming the country into a
net supplier of raw materials and consumer of finished industrial products from Britain. Obviously, the colonial
government never made any sincere attempt to estimate India’s national and per capita income. Some individual
attempts which were made to measure such incomes yielded conflicting and inconsistent results. Among the notable
estimators — Dadabhai Naoroji, William Digby, Findlay Shirras, V.K.R.V. Rao and R.C. Desai — it was Rao whose
estimates of the national and per capita incomes during the colonial period were considered very significant. However,
most studies did find that the country’s growth of aggregate real output during the first half of the twentieth century was
less than two per cent coupled with a meagre half per cent growth in per capita output per year.

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development NCRT notes and Solution PDF files

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development notes

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development Indian Economy on the Eve of Independence ncrt solution

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development Indian Economy [1950-1990]ncrt solution

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development Liberalization, Privatisation and Globalization ncrt solution

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development Poverty ncrt solution

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development Human Capital formation in India ncrt solution

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development Rural Development  ncrt solution

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development Employment ncrt solution

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development Infrastructure ncrt solution

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development Environment and sustainable Development  ncrt solution

CBSE class 11 commerce Economics Part B Indian Economic Development Comparative Development ncrt solution

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