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ACCA P3 Business Analyst computer based exam

ACCA P3 Business Analyst computer based exam

ACCA P3 Business Analyst computer based exam: ACCA stands for the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants a leading international accountancy body. The ACCA qualification is recognised and is treated in other countries as being equivalent to their local qualification.

Founded in 1904, the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) is the global professional accounting body offering the Chartered Certified Accountant qualification (ACCA or FCCA). From June 2016, ACCA recorded that it has 188,000 members and 480,000 students in 178 countries. ACCA’s headquarters are in London with principal administrative office in Glasgow. ACCA works through a network of 100 offices and centres and more than 7,100 Approved Employers worldwide, who provide employee development.

The term ‘Chartered’ in ACCA qualification refers to the Royal Charter granted in 1974.

Chartered Certified Accountant is a legally protected term. Individuals who describe themselves as Chartered Certified Accountants must be members of ACCA and if they carry out public practice engagements, must comply with additional regulations such as holding a practising certificate, carrying liability insurance and submitting to inspections.

The Association of Authorised Public Accountants (AAPA), one of the British professional bodies for public accountants, has been a subsidiary of ACCA since 1996.ACCA works in the public interest, assuring that its members are appropriately regulated. It promotes principles-based regulation. ACCA actively seeks to enhance the value of accounting in society through international research. It takes progressive stances on global issues to ensure accountancy as a profession continues to grow in reputation and influence.

ACCA works in the public interest, assuring that its members are appropriately regulated. It promotes principles-based regulation. ACCA actively seeks to enhance the value of accounting in society through international research. It takes progressive stances on global issues to ensure accountancy as a profession continues to grow in reputation and influence.

 

ACCA P3 Business Analyst computer based exam

Nature of the ACCA P3 paper

ACCA P3 Paper – Business Analysis – is concerned with analysing organisations, devising and deciding on strategic plans for them,  and dealing with some aspects of implementing those plans. There is a significant use of  F5 topics in the analysis and decision-making stages.

Structure of the ACCA P3 paper

Part A 50%:  a single case study question.  Typically, there are three or four pages of information provided in the question.

Part B 50%:  two from three 25 mark questions. Typically, each question provides one page of scenario information.

Emphasis of the exam

The syllabus  and study guide set out a large number of models (or frameworks) and these have to be known. However, it is rare for an exam to ask for the models to be described or explained. Exam questions expect you to apply the models to the information in the scenarios so that advice can be provided to the organisation.

How to pass ACCA P3 exam

Use the OpenTuition P3 lectures along with the P3 Notes and worked questions (revision lectures).  Make sure you know the models and understand how they are applied in the worked questions.

When you are confident of a topic then practise as many past exam questions as you can. Remember, although Question 1 sets out a large and forbidding amount of information, you have 15 minutes reading time at the start of the exam. You should use that time to become thoroughly familiar with Question 1.

ACCA P3 Business Analyst computer based exam

ACCA stands for the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants a leading international accountancy body. The ACCA qualification is recognised and is treated in other countries as being equivalent to their local qualification.

brief history of ACCA:

ACCA traces its origin to 1904, when eight people formed the London Association of Accountants to allow more open access to the profession than was available through the accounting bodies at the time, notably the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales and the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland. As of 2006, the goal of ACCA is to become the world’s largest global professional body.

The term ‘Chartered’ in ACCA qualification refers to the Royal Charter granted in 1974.

Chartered Certified Accountant is a legally protected term. Individuals who describe themselves as Chartered Certified Accountants must be members of ACCA and if they carry out public practice engagements, must comply with additional regulations such as holding a practising certificate, carrying liability insurance and submitting to inspections.

The Association of Authorised Public Accountants (AAPA), one of the British professional bodies for public accountants, has been a subsidiary of ACCA since 1996.

ACCA works in the public interest, assuring that its members are appropriately regulated. It promotes principles-based regulation. ACCA actively seeks to enhance the value of accounting in society through international research. It takes progressive stances on global issues to ensure accountancy as a profession continues to grow in reputation and influence.

ACCA P3 Business Analyst computer based exam

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